myQBook Grammar Concept



Complete Subject and Predicate

Together, a complete subject and a complete predicate make up an entire sentence. Every word of the sentence is either a part of the complete subject or the complete predicate.

·         The complete subject includes the main noun and all of its modifiers.

·         The complete predicate includes the main verb and all of the modifiers, objects, and phrases that add on to it. The complete predicate is basically anything that is not part of the complete subject.

Consider the following examples:

The hot coffee spilled all over the floor.

A perfect swing saved us the game.

In the above examples, the underlined text is the complete subject, while the bold text is the complete predicate. Notice that the complete subject includes the noun and all its modifiers, and the complete predicate includes the main verb and all the modifiers, objects, and phrases that add on to it.

 

As additional information, here is a classification of the words in the complete subject and predicate of the above examples.

First example:

Complete Subject

the noun “coffee”

the adjective “hot”

the article adjective “the”

 

Complete Predicate

the verb “spilled”

the adverb (in this case) “all”

the preposition “over”

the article adjective “the”

the object of the preposition “floor”

 

Second example:

Complete Subject

the noun “swing”

the adjective “perfect”

the article adjective “a”

 

Complete Predicate

the verb “saved”

the indirect object “us”

the article adjective “the”

the direct object “game”

 

 





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Simple Subject and Predicate
Compound Subjects and Predicates

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