myQBook Grammar Concept



Demonstrative Pronouns

A pronoun that points to a person or thing in general and specifies “which one” is called a demonstrative pronoun. There are only four demonstrative pronouns and they are: this, that, these, and those.

For example:

How did this book get in that shelf?
These fruits taste better than those in the red basket.

In the above sentences, “this”, “that”, “these” and “those” are demonstrative pronouns.

The two pronouns “this” and “that” are singular, and the two pronouns “these” and “those” are plural.

The two pronouns “this” and “these” specify that something is close by. For example:

These apples are delicious.

This book is great.

You would probably say the above sentences while you were either eating an apple or reading a book. This means that the objects are close by.

The two pronouns “that” and “those” specify that something is farther away. For example:

Those apples are delicious.

That book is great.

You would say the above sentences when the apples or the book is not right next to you, which means that the objects are farther away. However, the objects don’t have to be miles away for them to be considered “far away” in grammar. For example, a book could simply be on the other side of the room, and you would refer to it as “that book”.

 

Sometimes demonstrative pronouns are also used to refer to something that was said or done earlier. For example:

Clara talked badly to her teacher yesterday; that is inexcusable behavior.

In this example, the demonstrative pronoun “that” refers to "Clara talking badly to her teacher". Clara did this earlier, and the demonstrative pronoun “that” refers to her action from yesterday.

 





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Common Mistakes: Who vs. Whom
Indefinite Pronouns

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